How To Maximize Your Election Influence

Here's What To Do Today And On Election Day Tuesday is the most important election of your life, but voting is never enough. You can have a bigger impact by using social proof to increase your influence. I'll tell you how, and it won't take you long.

First, though, make sure nothing gets in the way of exercising your duty to vote.

Studies have shown that you are more likely to vote if you answer these questions before Election Day:

  1. Do you see yourself fulfilling your duty to vote? (Answer "Yes." Write it down.)
  2. What time do you plan to vote? (Write it down.)
  3. Where will you be coming from? (Work, home, etc. Write it down.)
  4. What will you be doing immediately before you go to vote? (A meeting at work? Dropping the kids off at day care? Write it down.)

Have a friend who might not vote? Ask him these four questions, and he's more likely than not to show up at the polls. But don't ask these questions of friends if you don't know they'll vote right.

Immediately After Voting

Voting empowers you with remarkable influence and credibility. You'll waste that power, though, if you don't put it to work. Here's what you need to do immediately after voting.

For each candidate or issue you support, tweet: "I just voted for [candidate] for [office]. [hashtag] #stltpc #election2012"

Examples:

I just voted for @MittRomney for President. #POTUS #stltpc #election2012

I just voted for @EdMartin4Mo for Attorney General. #MOAG #stltpc #election2012

I just voted No on Prop A. #PropANo #stltpc #election2012

Next, repeat the process on Facebook in a single post, but omit the hashtags. Studies show that twitter-style hashtags turn off Facebook users, making them less likely to Like, share, or comment.

Tell People You Voted

Finally, tell 3 people you voted and for whom. Check this out:

Even when we control for alternative sources of similar behavior, such as having the same income, education, ideology, or level of political interest, the typical subject is about 15 percent more likely to vote if one of his discussion partners votes [emphasis added].

Christakis, Nicholas A.; Fowler, James H. (2009-09-09). Connected: The Surprising Power of Our Social Networks and How They Shape Our Lives (p. 185). Hachette Book Group. Kindle Edition.

You've just maximized the power of voting. Your influence will spread to at least 3 degrees of separation reaching hundreds or hundreds of thousands of people, depending on how connected your network is.

Mitt Romney’s Cleaning Up in Early Voting, but It’s Confused the Hell Out of Politico

Gallup released its early voting poll today, and it shows Mitt Romney winning 52% to 45%—right in line with their Likely Voter poll numbers. Here’s the chart.

GallupEarlyVotingResults

Politico Reporter Can’t Read

But Gallup’s section on early voting by party ID completely lost Politico’s Kevin Robillard.

Robillard looked at the chart that shows when voters intend to vote by party and candidate and mistook it for voting results. This poll question shows that those who support Obama as as likely to vote early as are those who support Romney. No surprise. 

Here’s precisely what Gallup says about this section:

However, when one looks at the voting intentions of likely voters according to candidate support, the political impact for the two candidates appears to be roughly equal.

And here’s what Robillard thinks it says:

Neither candidate has a particular edge among early voters nationally compared to those who will cast their ballots on election day
Read more: http://www.politico.com/news/stories/1012/83039.html#ixzz2ApGGRw56

Robillard doesn’t understand that there are simply MORE people who intend to vote for Romney than for Obama. 

What’s worse is the entire liberal media establishment is now confused—or lying—about the poll. They’re taking Robillard’s stupidity and running with it.

More Bad News For Obama

John Nolte points out that Obama’s early voting results are down 22 points from 2008.  That’s huge, and explains why Minnesota and Pennsylvania have moved from Safe for Obama to Toss-Up. 

If Romney wins Pennsylvania, we’ll be celebrating early on the November 6.  Call your friends in PA, comment on Pennsylvania blogs and news sites.  Target people who will vote right if they vote.  Forget conversions—just move the friendlies.